Faunal remains from Tel Abel Beth Maacah: Social change in the late second millennium BCE Hula Valley

Nimrod Marom*, Shlomit Bechar, Nava Panitz-Cohen, Robert A. Mullins, Naama Yahalom-Mack

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Hula Valley, a gateway from Syria and Lebanon to the southern Levant, was dominated in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages by the city-state of Hazor. Following the desolation of the latter in the 13th century BCE, it seems that Abel Beth Maacah became the leading polity in the region, showing a remarkable sequence of Iron Age I architecture. We examine this regional power shift using a zooarchaeological sequence from Abel Beth Maacah, which suggests the economic impact of pastoral nomads on the region during the Middle Bronze Age, and a reversion to traditional, extensive agro-pastoralism in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number102394
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Volume32
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Bronze Age
  • Levant
  • Pastoralism
  • Zooarchaeology

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