First molecular identification of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus in a cat presenting severe respiratory disease from Israel

Daniel Yasur-Landau*, Alicia Rojas, Tamar Zehavi, Yuval Yafe, Yigal Anug, Gad Baneth

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Feline lung worm infection is increasingly reported in recent years, and recognized as a cause for respiratory disease in cats. Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is regarded as the most prevalent cause of such cases. Infective L3 larvae carried in gastropods and paratenic hosts infect felines, developing to adult worms that reside in the lungs' parenchyma and may cause verminous pneumonia. The L1 larvae hatch from eggs deposited in the lung, and are released to the environment by either feces or sputum. While the majority of epidemiological information regarding A. abstrusus originates in European countries, recent studies have shown that it is also found around the Mediterranean basin, as far east as Turkey and Cyprus. A local domestic cat from Israel showing signs of respiratory illness was diagnosed with aelurostrongylosis, confirmed by both morphological and molecular tools. Presence in Israel of this nematode was previously reported in 1949, with no further mentions since. ITS-2 sequence of the isolated larvae was highly similar to that of A. abstrusus from domestic cats from Italy. These findings show that distribution of A. abstrusus stretch to the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, and that this nematode should be considered as a cause for respiratory disease in cats in Israel and the surrounding countries.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number100304
JournalVeterinary Parasitology: Regional Studies and Reports
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Aelurostrongylus abstrusus
  • Cat
  • Israel
  • Lungworm

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