FROM ORAL DISCOURSE TO WRITTEN DOCUMENTS

Reuven Kiperwasser*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Whereas rabbis generally insisted on the importance of oral study and coined the term Oral Torah for their literary traditions, eventually, they seemed to have preferred the written transmission of their knowledge. Otherwise, we would not have had at our disposal the various collections of rabbinic literature. The very habit of calling a collection of written texts “an oral teaching” can be interpreted as the reflection of a diachronic process: oral traditions were transmitted but somewhere along the way they were fixed in writing. Little is known about the nature of this process. This paper surveys of state of art in this area and aims to contribute to the discourse by adding some new theories and insights.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Handbook of Jews and Judaism in Late Antiquity
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages249-262
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781315280967
ISBN (Print)9781138241220
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Taylor and Francis.

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