Generational effects on marriage patterns: Jewish immigrants and their descendants in Israel

Binyamin Gshur*, Barbara S. Okun

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

We analyze various effects of generational status on marriage patterns of Jewish immigrants and their descendants in Israel over the last 4 decades. We report the following findings: (a) important, independent effects of generational endogamy on marriage patterns in all periods; (b) steady declines in ethnic endogamy among the native born, along with stability in levels of ethnic endogamy among first-generation immigrants over the past 3 decades; (c) effects of generational status on the propensity to marry in all periods. Our results suggest an increase over time in the relative importance of generational factors in marriage patterns. This conclusion contrasts with previous research documenting general declines in the importance of ascriptive characteristics in marriage behavior.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)287-301
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • Endogamy
  • Generation
  • Homogamy
  • Immigration
  • Israel
  • Marriage

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