German teachers' pilgrimage to an Israeli Holocaust Memorial: Emotions, encounters, and contested visions

Lance Levenson*, Friederike Lorenz-Sinai, Fabian Kessl, Julia Resnik

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on anthropological conceptions of pilgrimage, our ethnography of professional development at an Israeli Holocaust Memorial follows German teachers on journeys to Israel. Seeking transformative and transferable experiences to combat anti-Semitism in schools, teachers experienced the voyage as a secular pilgrimage rooted in Christian traditions of guilt, confession, and absolution. As teachers' emotional encounters in Israel simultaneously forged communitas and challenged official historical–pedagogical visions, their practices abroad elucidate prevalent Holocaust education discourses in contemporary Germany.

Original languageAmerican English
JournalAnthropology and Education Quarterly
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors. Anthropology & Education Quarterly published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Anthropological Association.

Keywords

  • Holocaust education
  • emotions
  • memorial sites
  • pilgrimage
  • teacher professional development

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