Helping characteristics of self-help and support groups: Their contribution to participants' subjective well-being

Miriam Schiff*, David Bargal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article deals with outcomes of self-help and support groups, based on the relationships between the groups' helping characteristics (i.e., instilling hope, caring and concern) and two variables: participants' subjective well-being and general satisfaction with the group. It was hypothesized that the contribution of the helping characteristics to the participants 'subjective well-being would be mediated by the extent of their overall satisfaction with the group. The study also compared 12-step self-help groups to other support groups. The research sample consisted of 117 participants belonging to 11 groups meeting in Israel. The results supported the mediation hypothesis. Comparison of the 12-step groups and the other support groups revealed that 12-step group members were far more satisfied with the group and gave higher evaluations for most of the helping characteristics. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)275-304
Number of pages30
JournalSmall Group Research
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

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