Helps you, helps me? Provision of instrumental and personal care and loneliness among adults aged 50 years and older during the COVID-19 pandemic

Dennis Rosenberg*, Sharon Shiovitz-Ezra, Liat Ayalon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the association between provision of instrumental and personal care, and loneliness in adults aged 50 years and older during the COVID-19 pandemic. Instrumental care referred to the provision of assistance with obtaining necessary or essential products and/or services, whereas personal care referred to the assistance with daily life activities or the provision of emotional support. Social capital and caregiver stress theories served as the study's theoretical framework. Materials and methods: The data were obtained from the two COVID-19 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) conducted in 2020 and 2021. The data were analyzed using logistic regression models. The analytical sample consisted of 48,722 adults in the abovementioned age bracket residing in Europe and Israel. Results: Providing instrumental care negatively related to loneliness. Providing instrumental care to a single category of people negatively related to loneliness, whereas providing personal care to multiple categories of people positively related to loneliness. Providing personal care to children positively related to loneliness. Conclusions: The results suggest that different types of care provision correspond differently to the experience of loneliness while partially supporting both theoretical frameworks. Moreover, care indicators correspond differently to loneliness. The results imply that for a better understanding of the link between care provision and loneliness in later life, various parameters as well as various types of care provision should be examined.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number105065
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume113
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This paper uses data from SHARE COVID-19 Survey 1 (Börsch-Supan, 2021) and SHARE COVID-19 Survey 2 (Börsch-Supan, 2022). The SHARE data collection has been funded by the European Commission through FP5 (QLK6-CT-20 01–0 0360), FP6 (SHARE-I3: RII-CT-200 6–0 62193 , COMPARE: CIT5-CT-2005–028857, SHARELIFE: CIT4-CT-2006–028812), FP7 (SHARE-PREP: GA N °211909 , SHARE-LEAP: GA N °227822 , SHARE M4: GA N °261982, DASISH: GA N °283646), and Horizon 2020 (SHARE-DEV3: GA N °676536 , SHARE-COHESION: GA N °870628 , SERISS: GA N °654221 , SSHOC: GA N °823782) and by DG Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion through VS 2015/0195, VS 2016/0135, VS 2018/0285, VS 2019/0332, and VS 2020/0313. Additional funding from the German Ministry of Education and Research, the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, the U.S. National Institute on aging (U01_AG09740–13S2, P01_AG005842, P01_AG08291, P30_AG12815, R21_AG025169, Y1-AG-4553–01, IAG_BSR0 6–11, OGHA_04–0 64, HHSN27120130 0 071C) and from several national funding sources is gratefully acknowledged (see https://share-eric.eu/). This study has received no support from any institution in public, private or not-for-profit sector.

Funding Information:
This paper uses data from SHARE COVID-19 Survey 1 (Börsch-Supan, 2021) and SHARE COVID-19 Survey 2 (Börsch-Supan, 2022). The SHARE data collection has been funded by the European Commission through FP5 (QLK6-CT-20 01–0 0360), FP6 (SHARE-I3: RII-CT-200 6–0 62193, COMPARE: CIT5-CT-2005–028857, SHARELIFE: CIT4-CT-2006–028812), FP7 (SHARE-PREP: GA N °211909, SHARE-LEAP: GA N °227822, SHARE M4: GA N °261982, DASISH: GA N °283646), and Horizon 2020 (SHARE-DEV3: GA N °676536, SHARE-COHESION: GA N °870628, SERISS: GA N °654221, SSHOC: GA N °823782) and by DG Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion through VS 2015/0195, VS 2016/0135, VS 2018/0285, VS 2019/0332, and VS 2020/0313. Additional funding from the German Ministry of Education and Research, the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, the U.S. National Institute on aging (U01_AG09740–13S2, P01_AG005842, P01_AG08291, P30_AG12815, R21_AG025169, Y1-AG-4553–01, IAG_BSR0 6–11, OGHA_04–0 64, HHSN27120130 0 071C) and from several national funding sources is gratefully acknowledged (see https://share-eric.eu/).

Funding Information:
The work was supported by the H2020 SHARE-COVID19 project [grant agreement no. 101015924].

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Instrumental care
  • Loneliness
  • Middle-aged adults
  • Older adults
  • Personal care

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