High resolution optical spectral filtering technology: Reaching the sub-GHz resolution range

Dan M. Marom, David Sinefeld, Ori Golani, Noam Goldshtein, Roy Zektzer, Roy Rudnick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Fine optical filtering is instrumental in fully utilizing the optical gain bandwidth with communication signals. We present the design of a hybrid guided-wave / free-space filtering apparatus based on high resolution Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWG). These hybrid systems, called photonic spectral processors (PSP), can access and manipulate the fine spectral components of a lightwave signal with a spatial light modulator. In order to achieve sub-GHz resolution of the PSP, an AWG with large number of waveguides and long incremental waveguide lengths is needed. Such an AWG require careful design in order to enable relatively compact realization with a dense waveguide count, and an additional step of phase error correction which are inevitable in such design. In this paper we review the design consideration of a high resolution AWG with 200 GHz FSR and sub-GHZ spectral resolution and describe the phase errors interferometric measurement system and the UV trimming system which is needed as an essential post production process.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publication2013 15th International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks, ICTON 2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event2013 15th International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks, ICTON 2013 - Cartagena, Spain
Duration: 23 Jun 201327 Jun 2013

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Transparent Optical Networks
ISSN (Electronic)2162-7339

Conference

Conference2013 15th International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks, ICTON 2013
Country/TerritorySpain
CityCartagena
Period23/06/1327/06/13

Keywords

  • ROADM
  • arrayed waveguide grating
  • optical filtering

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