How do we measure and monitor the "state of our children"?. Revisiting the topic in honor of Sheila B. Kamerman

Asher Ben-Arieh*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

The last quarter of the 20th century has brought a growing attention to the efforts to measure and monitor children's well-being, as can be seen in the quantity of various "State of the Child" reports. Many have argued that the attention has continued and even intensified during the first decade of the 21st century. This study explores the development of "state of the child" reports between 2000 and 2010 in an effort to not only quantify the development but also to understand the shifts and changes in the field. Findings support earlier research showing that the field is rapidly developing around the globe. Furthermore, the findings support earlier arguments that the field can be characterized by nine shifts or changes. The study lends an empirical basis for the arguments presented to date and draws a unique picture of this rapidly evolving field of measuring and monitoring children's well-being. Finally, the study predicts that the field will continue to move in these directions but most likely at a considerably faster pace, particularly in the developing countries.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)569-575
Number of pages7
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Child welfare
  • Child well being
  • Social indicators
  • State of the child
  • Status of children

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