How has the Israel national police perceived its role in counterterrorism and potential outcomes? A qualitative analysis of annual police reports

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Since the terror attack of September 11, 2001, police forces in the democratic world have become significantly more aware of potential terrorist threats and increased their involvement in counterterrorism (Bayley and Weisburd 2009; International Association of Chiefs of Police 2005; National Research Council 2004). Counterterrorism was a relatively new role for local police agencies in countries such as the United States and not necessarily perceived as natural (IACP 2005; Weisburd, Jonathan, and Perry 2009), and thus, along with the rise in policing terrorism, police scholars and practitioners have begun to debate, speculate on, and investigate the effects that this unique responsibility may have on the performance of the police, their role in society, and their relationship with the public (e.g., Fishman 2005; Lyons 2002; Murray 2005; Thacher 2005; Weisburd, Feucht, Hakimi, Mock, and Perry 2009; Weisburd, Jonathan, and Perry 2009).

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationPolicing in Israel
Subtitle of host publicationStudying Crime Control, Community, and Counterterrorism
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages221-236
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781498722575
ISBN (Print)9781498722568
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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