Implicit Theories, Social Support, and Hope as Serial Mediators for Predicting Academic Self-Efficacy Among Higher Education Students

Adi Mana, Noa Saka, Orit Dahan, Anat Ben-Simon, Malka Margalit*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the predictive role of learning difficulties in the academic self-efficacy of students enrolled in higher education institutions and the serial multiple mediation of inner and external resources. The sample consisted of 2,113 students (age range = 18–35 years) at 25 higher education institutions in Israel. Participants were divided into four groups: (a) 668 typical students (without learning difficulties or attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]), (b) 370 students with self-reported but undiagnosed academic difficulties, (c) 372 students diagnosed with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), and (d) 703 students diagnosed with attention-deficit disorders (ADHD). Implicit theories on accommodations, perceptions of social support, hope, and academic self-efficacy were examined. Results demonstrated that students with SLD and ADHD had higher beliefs in the value of expectations, yet they experienced lower levels of academic self-efficacy than their typical peers. These implicit theories did not predict directly the academic self-efficacy, but external resources (perceptions of support) and internal resources (hope) mediated these relationships. The results focused on the accommodations and beliefs in their value for predicting academic self-efficacy, and the importance of social support and hope.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalLearning Disability Quarterly
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2020.

Keywords

  • academic self-efficacy
  • accommodations
  • hope
  • implicit theories
  • social support

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