In vitro and in vivo model systems for studying enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infections

Robyn J. Law, Lihi Gur-Arie, Ilan Rosenshine, B. Brett Finlay*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) belong to a group of bacteria known as attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens that cause disease by adhering to the lumenal surfaces of their host's intestinal epithelium. EPEC and EHEC are major causes of infectious diarrhea that result in significant childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in in vitro and in vivo modeling of these pathogens have contributed to our knowledge of how EPEC and EHEC attach to host cells and subvert hostcell signaling pathways to promote infection and cause disease. A more detailed understanding of how these pathogenic microbes infect their hosts and how the host responds to infection could ultimately lead to new therapeutic strategies to help control these significant enteric pathogens.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbera009977
JournalCold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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