In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial activity of a local sustained release device containing amine fluoride for the treatment of oral infectious diseases

Segev Shani, Michael Friedman, Doron Steinberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dental caries and periodontal diseases are chronic infectious diseases caused by oral bacteria. Local sustained release delivery systems extend the time in which the drug is present in the oral cavity, thus enhancing its therapeutic potential while reducing its side effects. Amine-fluorides (AmF) are known anticaries agents and have recently been found to have art antibacterial effects against periodontal pathogens and caries-associated bacteria. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of a local sustained release device (LSRD) containing AmF on Streptococcus sobrinus 6715. LSRD was prepared from an ethylcellulose matrix containing AmF. Release kinetics of AmF from the LSRD was measured simultaneously with its antimicrobial activity. The organic amine and the fluoride were released in different kinetics profiles: The fluoride was released faster than the organic amine. The antimicrobial activity of AmF was measured on planktonic bacteria in solution and on bacteria as part of experimental dental plaque. During a 10-day period, the concentration of the released AmF was above its MIC and no bacterial growth was observed. Bacterial counts in the dental plaque were reduced by 1 to 2 log units. Hence, the LSRD containing AmF has the potential to serve as a medicament in prevention and treatment of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)93-97
Number of pages5
JournalDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998

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