Inactivation of Snt2, a BAH/PHD-containing transcription factor, impairs pathogenicity and increases autophagosome abundance in Fusarium oxysporum

Youlia Denisov, Stanley Freeman, Oded Yarden*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

The soil-borne, asexual fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis (FOM) is a causal agent of muskmelon wilt disease. The current study focused on the most virulent race of FOM-race 1,2. The tagged mutant D122, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, caused the delayed appearance of initial wilt disease symptoms, as well as a 75% reduction in pathogenicity. D122 was impaired in the gene product homologous to the Snt2-like transcription factor of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Involvement of snt2 in the early stage of FOM pathogenesis and its requirement for host colonization were confirmed by targeted disruption followed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of snt2 expression in planta. Δsnt2 mutants of FOM and Neurospora crassa exhibited similar morphological abnormalities, including a reduction in conidia production and biomass accumulation, slower vegetative growth and frequent hyphal septation. In N. crassa, snt-2 is required for sexual development, as Δsnt-2 mutants were unable to produce mature perithecia. Suppressive subtraction hybridization analysis of the D122 mutant versus wild-type isolate detected four genes (idi4, pdc, msf1, eEF1G) that were found previously in association with the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase pathway. Expression of the autophagy-related idi4 and pdc genes was found to be up-regulated in the Δsnt2 FOM mutant. In N. crassa, disruption of snt-2 also conferred a significant over-expression of idi4.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)449-461
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Plant Pathology
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

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