Individuals vary in their overt attention preference for positive images consistently across time and stimulus types

Nitzan Guy, Asael Y. Sklar*, Revital Amiaz, Yael Golan, Abigail Livny, Yoni Pertzov

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

What humans look at strongly determines what they see. We show that individual differences in the tendency to look at positive stimuli are stable across time and across contents, establishing gaze positivity preference as a perceptual trait that determines the amount of positively valence stimuli individuals select for visual processing. Furthermore, we show that patients with major depressive disorder exhibit consistently low positivity preference before treatment. In a subset of patients, we also assessed the positivity preference after two months of treatment in which positivity gaze preference increased to levels similar to healthy individuals. We discuss the possible practical diagnostic applications of these findings, as well as how this general gaze-related trait may influence other behavioral and psychological aspects.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number8712
JournalScientific Reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2024.

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Eye tracking
  • Individual differences
  • Positivity preference
  • Valence

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Individuals vary in their overt attention preference for positive images consistently across time and stimulus types'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this