Insertion of the precursor of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein into the thylakoids requires the presence of a developmentally regulated stromal factor

Parag R. Chitnis*, Rachel Nechushtai, J. Philip Thornber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

The precursor of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-proteins of photosystem II was synthesized in vitro from a gene from Lemna gibba. When the labelled precursor was incubated with developing barley plastids, the precursor and the processed polypeptide were incorporated in the thylakoids in proportions that varied depending on the developmental stage of plastids. At early stages of development most of the precursor associated with the thylakoids could be removed by washing with 0.1 M NaOH, while in more mature plastids most of its was resistant to a NaOH wash. Insertion of the precursor into thylakoids required the presence of a stromal factor and Mg-ATP. The stromal factor is probably a protein. The insertion reaction has an optimal temperature of 25°C and a pH of 8. The appearance of the stromal factor and the thylakoid membrane's receptivity for the insertion of the precursor depended on the stage of plastid development. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the insertion of the precursor into the thylakoid prior to its proteolytic processing, is one of the steps involved in the assembly of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Molecular Biology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chloroplasts
  • light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-proteins
  • membrane insertion
  • plastid development
  • thylakoid protein precursor

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