Insoluble fibrinogen particles for harvesting and expanding attachment-dependent cells and for trapping suspended cancer cells in the presence of blood

Duha Fahham, Emmanuelle Merquiol, Tamar Gilon, Gerard Marx, Galia Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fibrinogen has the potential of being used as a material to harvest and grow normal mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts, endothelial cells) or to trap cancer cells from a suspension with blood as a potential circulatory trap. Insoluble fibrinogen particles (iFP) were prepared from commercial Cohn fraction I paste (source: Kedrion). The sized iFP (∼60-180 μm) were not soluble in physiologic buffers, exhibited a density of 1.2 ± 0.02, and did not aggregate or clump when mixed with whole blood or thrombin, but were degraded in lytic solutions. Cell culture studies indicated that the iFP could be used to harvest, expand and transfer normal, mammalian, attachment-dependent cells, notably fibroblasts and stem cells from bone marrow, as well as numerous cancer lines. Cells attached to iFP underwent logarithmic growth kinetics and could be transferred without trypsinization. Transplanted cancer cells-on-iFP generated characteristic tumors and retained their surface marker (by Western immuno-blot). An iFP 'cell-affinity' batch column was shown to trap MCF-7 cancer cells in the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) or serum. The scalable process for fabricating iFP retained the cell attachment properties of native fibrinogen. The results indicate that iFP has the potential to be used as a 3D cell culture matrix, and possibly to trap cancer cells from blood.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number025010
JournalBiomedical Materials (Bristol)
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Keywords

  • cancer cells
  • cell culture
  • fibrinogen
  • stem cells

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