Intake of and Preference for Sweet Solutions Are Attenuated in Morphine-Withdrawn Rats

Israel Lieblich, Raz Yirmiya*, John C. Liebeskind

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypothesis that intake of sweet solutions is partially controlled by endogenous opioid peptides was tested in 2 experiments that examined the effects of repetitive morphine administration and withdrawal on subsequent intake of and preference for saccharin solutions in rats. Experiment 1 established that 17 hr after morphine withdrawal, rats consumed less saccharin, but not less water, than did controls. The groups did not differ 8 days later. In Experiment 2, using a 2-bottle saccharin-preference test, rats exhibited a reduced preference to saccharin solutions (1, 3, 9, 30, or 60 mM) for 6 days after morphine withdrawal. The difference between the groups was most pronounced at the most preferred concentrations (9 and 30 mM). The results suggest that cross-tolerance occurs between morphine and the opioid-mediated hedonic effects of sweet solutions.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)965-970
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume105
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1991

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