Integrated high-resolution dataset of high-intensity European and Mediterranean flash floods

William Amponsah*, Pierre Alain Ayral, Brice Boudevillain, Christophe Bouvier, Isabelle Braud, Pascal Brunet, Guy Delrieu, Jean François DIdon-Lescot, Eric Gaume, Laurent Lebouc, Lorenzo Marchi, Francesco Marra, Efrat Morin, Guillaume Nord, Olivier Payrastre, Davide Zoccatelli, Marco Borga

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes an integrated, high-resolution dataset of hydro-meteorological variables (rainfall and discharge) concerning a number of high-intensity flash floods that occurred in Europe and in the Mediterranean region from 1991 to 2015. This type of dataset is rare in the scientific literature because flash floods are typically poorly observed hydrological extremes. Valuable features of the dataset (hereinafter referred to as the EuroMedeFF database) include (i) its coverage of varied hydro-climatic regions, ranging from Continental Europe through the Mediterranean to Arid climates, (ii) the high space-time resolution radar rainfall estimates, and (iii) the dense spatial sampling of the flood response, by observed hydrographs and/or flood peak estimates from post-flood surveys. Flash floods included in the database are selected based on the limited upstream catchment areas (up to 3000 km2), the limited storm durations (up to 2 days), and the unit peak flood magnitude. The EuroMedeFF database comprises 49 events that occurred in France, Israel, Italy, Romania, Germany and Slovenia, and constitutes a sample of rainfall and flood discharge extremes in different climates. The dataset may be of help to hydrologists as well as other scientific communities because it offers benchmark data for the identification and analysis of the hydro-meteorological causative processes, evaluation of flash flood hydrological models and for hydro-meteorological forecast systems. The dataset also provides a template for the analysis of the space-time variability of flash flood triggering rainfall fields and of the effects of their estimation on the flood response modelling. The dataset is made available to the public with the following DOI: https://doi.org/10.6096/MISTRALS-HyMeX.1493.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1783-1794
Number of pages12
JournalEarth System Science Data
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Oct 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This paper contributes to the HyMeX programme (www.hymex.org, last access: 2 October 2018). Collation of hydrometeorological data and processing of data collated through post-flood surveys for the Italian events have been done in the framework of the Next-Data Project (Italian Ministry of University and Research and the National Research Council of Italy - CNR). Part of the data was acquired through the Hydrometeorological Data Resources and Technologies for Effective Flash Flood Forecasting (HYDRATE) project (European Commission, Sixth Framework Programme, contract 037024). Part of the data provided in this dataset was acquired during the FloodScale project, funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) under contract no. ANR 2011 BS56 027. We also benefited from funding by the MISTRALS/HyMeX programme (http://www.mistrals-home.org, last access: 2 October 2018), in particular for post-flood surveys. The rainfall reanalyses for the French events were provided by the OHM-CV observatory (observation service supported by the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers, section Surface et Interfaces Continentales and the Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de Grenoble). We thank Arthur Hamburger, whose work was supported by Labex OSUG@2020 (Investissements d'avenir - ANR10 LABX56) and the SCHAPI.We also thank the SCHAPI, EDF-DTG, for providing some of the French streamgauge discharge data, and Meteo France for providing French raingauge and radar input data. For Israel, raw radar data were obtained from E.M.S. (Mekorot company), raingauge data from the Israel Meteorological Service, streamgauge data from the Israel Hydrological Service, and post-flood estimates from reports by the Soil Erosion Research Station at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The HyMeX database teams (ESPRI/IPSL and SEDOO/Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées) helped in making the dataset available in the HyMeX database.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements. This paper contributes to the HyMeX programme (www.hymex.org, last access: 2 October 2018). Collation of hydrometeorological data and processing of data collated through post-flood surveys for the Italian events have been done in the framework of the Next-Data Project (Italian Ministry of University and Research and the National Research Council of Italy – CNR). Part of the data was acquired through the Hydrometeorological Data Resources and Technologies for Effective Flash Flood Forecasting (HYDRATE) project (European Commission, Sixth Framework Programme, contract 037024). Part of the data provided in this dataset was acquired during the FloodScale project, funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) under contract no. ANR 2011 BS56 027. We also benefited from funding by the MISTRALS/HyMeX programme (http://www.mistrals-home.org, last access: 2 October 2018), in particular for post-flood surveys. The rainfall reanalyses for the French events were provided by the OHM-CV observatory (observation service supported by the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers, section Surface et Interfaces Continentales and the Observatoire des Sciences de l’Univers de Grenoble). We thank Arthur Hamburger, whose work was supported by Labex OSUG@2020 (Investissements d’avenir – ANR10 LABX56) and the SCHAPI. We also thank the SCHAPI, EDF-DTG, for providing some of the French streamgauge discharge data, and Meteo France for providing French raingauge and radar input data. For Israel, raw radar data were obtained from E.M.S. (Mekorot company), raingauge data from the Israel Meteorological Service, streamgauge data from the Israel Hydrological Service, and post-flood estimates from reports by the Soil Erosion Research Station at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The HyMeX database teams (ESPRI/IPSL and SEDOO/Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées) helped in making the dataset available in the HyMeX database.

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) 2018.

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