Intention to work with individuals with dual diagnosis: Testing the theory of planned behavior among students from various professions

Shirli Werner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Providing holistic care to individuals with the dual diagnosis (DD) of intellectual disability and mental illness is a challenging task that requires the work of various health care specialists. The aim of the current study was to examine the intentions of students from various fields to work with individuals with DD. A questionnaire was completed by 512 social work, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, special education, and nursing students in Israel to measure students' attitudes toward working with individuals with DD, as well as their perceptions of subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling showed that the students' intentions to work with individuals with DD were predicted by their attitudes and perceptions of subjective norms. Controllability was found to negatively affect their behavioral intentions. Furthermore, social work and nursing students were found to have the lowest behavioral intentions. Given the lack of education in the field of DD and the prevailing stigmatic attitudes toward this population, university programs should focus on increasing knowledge, promoting positive contact, and reducing the fear attached to working with people with DD. 2012 National Association of Social Workers2012

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)81-89
Number of pages9
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Behavioral intention
  • Dual diagnosis
  • Intellectual disability
  • Theory of planned behavior

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