Investigation of the potential direct and cross protection effects of sublethal injured Salmonella Typhimurium induced by radio frequency heating stress

Shunshan Jiao, Hangjin Zhang, Meiji Liao, Zvi Hayouka, Pu Jing*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many studies demonstrated that radio frequency (RF) was an effective pasteurization method for low-moisture foods (LMFs), and our previous study confirmed RF heating stress generated sublethal injured cells (SICs) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in red pepper powder with initial aw ≥ 0.53. So this study investigated the potential direct protection and cross protection effects of the SICs of S. Typhimurium to multiple stresses, and analyzed fatty acid composition and cell morphology. Results showed that the SICs were repaired after incubating for 5 h, and there were no obvious direct and cross protection effects by exposing to different external stresses (heat, 15% ethanol, pH 3.0 acid buffer solution, 10% salt). According to the fatty acid composition analysis, no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) was observed for SICs of S. Typhimurium and control cells, indicating the same membrane fluidity which can support the experimental results. This study investigated and confirmed there are no direct and cross protection effects for the SICs of S. Typhimurium induced by RF heating stress, and it would be helpful for deeply understand the response of pathogens under RF heating stress.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number110789
JournalFood Research International
Volume150
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • Cell morphology
  • Fatty acid
  • Low-moisture foods
  • Pasteurization
  • Water activity

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