Is birthweight influenced equally by maternal and paternal anthropometry?

Abu Shqara Raneen*, Daoud Sabag Lina, Myriam Safrai, Liat Matan, Shay Porat

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To elucidate the influence of parental biometric factors on fetal birthweight (BW). Study design: This prospective study was conducted between 2015 and 2017 in Hadassah University Hospital. Inclusion criteria included singletons that were born to healthy mothers at 37–41 weeks’ gestation and had no growth abnormality or congenital malformation. Maternal and paternal head circumference, weight, and height were measured. Other data including neonatal head circumference and neonatal birthweight were also collected. Neonatal head circumference and birthweight percentiles were converted to sex-specific ranks according to the neonatal Intergrowth 21 charts (rank = 1 for percentile <3, rank = 2 for percentile 3–10, etc.). Results: One hundred and ninety-nine trios (mother, father, and neonate) were included in the final analysis. In univariate analysis, maternal head circumference (p =.006), maternal height (p =.001), maternal weight before pregnancy (p <.001), maternal weight at term (p <.001), gestational weight gain (p =.009), paternal height (p =.018), neonatal head circumference (p <.001), and neonatal head circumference percentile rank (p <.001) were significant predictors of neonatal birthweight percentile rank. In multivariate regression, the three factors that were significant independent predictors of neonatal birthweight percentile rank were maternal weight before pregnancy (p =.047), maternal weight at term (p =.01), and neonatal head circumference percentile rank (p <.001). No interaction was found between neonatal sex and any of the tested variables. Neonatal sex-specific multivariate analysis showed that maternal height (p =.013), gestational weight gain (p =.005), and neonatal head circumference percentile rank (p <.001) were predictors of birthweight percentile rank in males. Maternal weight at term (p <.001) and neonatal head circumference percentile rank (p <.001) were predictors of birthweight percentile rank in females. Conclusions: Maternal height and weight parameters as well as neonatal head circumference percentile rank were found to be independent predictors of birthweight percentile rank. Paternal parameters did not show any significant association in multivariable analysis. The biological regulation of fetal size is assumed to be the result of strong evolutionary selection. As the fetus must pass through the mother's birth canal, there should be a natural match between maternal and fetal size to ensure the successful birth and survival of mother and offspring.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)9792-9799
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume35
Issue number25
Early online date25 Mar 2022
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Maternal biometry
  • gestational weight gain
  • intrauterine environment
  • neonatal birthweight
  • neonatal head circumference
  • paternal biometry

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