Keyboarding Difficulties: Frequency and Characteristics among Higher Education Students with Handwriting Difficulties

Tali Rosenberg-Adler, Naomi Weintraub*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Word processing is often considered an alternative writing mode or test accommodation for students with specific learning disorders who have handwriting difficulties (HD). Therefore, it is important for researchers and educators to understand the difficulties these students may encounter while using this technology. We examined the frequency of keyboarding difficulties (KD; i.e., slow keyboarding) among higher education students with HD, and the underlying functions (language, fine-motor, and attention) of these disabilities compared to students with only HD. Of the 50 students with HD, 24 percent were found to have KD. This group had significantly lower scores in phonological and orthographic skills, but not in fine-motor and attention functions, compared to students with HD alone. These results support models suggesting that handwriting and keyboarding share linguistic processes. They also suggest that for students with lower linguistic functions, word processing via keyboarding may not be an effective writing mode, and that these students may require tailored accommodation.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)82-88
Number of pages7
JournalLearning Disabilities Research and Practice
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Division for Learning Disabilities of the Council for Exceptional Children

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Keyboarding Difficulties: Frequency and Characteristics among Higher Education Students with Handwriting Difficulties'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this