Keyboarding versus handwriting speed of higher education students with and without learning disabilities: Does touch-typing assist in narrowing the gap?

Hayley Weigelt-Marom*, Naomi Weintraub

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Keyboarding has become an essential writing mode. Yet, many do not keyboard as fast as they handwrite, perhaps due to lack of efficient keyboarding skills. The current study examined the immediate and long-term effect of a touch-typing program on narrowing the gap between keyboarding and handwriting speed among higher education students. The study included 17 normally achieving students and 25 students with specific learning disabilities (i.e., reading and/or writing disabilities). Results showed that at the end of the program, handwriting remained a faster writing mode than keyboarding. This condition changed over time, and at the delayed post-test (approximately 3 months following the completion of the program), keyboarding became faster than handwriting. However, this change was significant only within the group of students with specific learning disabilities. These results stress the importance of efficient and automatic keyboarding for writing among the general population and particularly among students with specific learning disabilities.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)132-140
Number of pages9
JournalComputers and Education
Volume117
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Assistive technology
  • Handwriting
  • Keyboarding
  • Learning disabilities
  • Typewriting

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