Late Pleistocene age and archaeological context for the hominin calvaria from GvJm-22 (Lukenya Hill, Kenya)

Christian A. Tryon*, Isabelle Crevecoeur, J. Tyler Faith, Ravid Ekshtain, Joelle Nivens, David Patterson, Emma N. Mbua, Fred Spoor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Kenya National Museums Lukenya Hill Hominid 1 (KNM-LH 1) is a Homo sapiens partial calvaria from site GvJm-22 at Lukenya Hill, Kenya, associated with Later Stone Age (LSA) archaeological deposits. KNM-LH 1 is securely dated to the Late Pleistocene, and samples a time and region important for understanding the origins of modern human diversity. A revised chronology based on 26 accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ostrich eggshells indicates an age range of 23,576-22,887 y B.P. for KNM-LH 1, confirming prior attribution to the Last Glacial Maximum. Additional dates extend the maximum age for archaeological deposits at GvJm-22 to >46,000 y B.P. (>46 kya). These dates are consistent with new analyses identifying both Middle Stone Age and LSA lithic technologies at the site, making GvJm-22 a rare eastern African record of major human behavioral shifts during the Late Pleistocene. Comparative morphometric analyses of the KNM-LH 1 cranium document the temporal and spatial complexity of early modern human morphological variability. Features of cranial shape distinguish KNM-LH 1 and other Middle and Late Pleistocene African fossils from crania of recent Africans and samples from Holocene LSA and European Upper Paleolithic sites.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)2682-2687
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Homo sapiens
  • Later Stone Age
  • Middle Stone Age
  • Modern human origins
  • Ostrich eggshell

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Late Pleistocene age and archaeological context for the hominin calvaria from GvJm-22 (Lukenya Hill, Kenya)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this