Learning from bottom-up dissemination: Importing an evidence-based trauma intervention for infants and young children to Israel

Paula David*, Miriam Schiff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article describes a pilot study of a "bottom up" dissemination process of a new evidence based intervention for treating early childhood trauma. Clinicians applied to learn Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), imported to Israel from the U.S. A focus group of six graduates of a CPP training program responded to questions concerning their experiences learning and using CPP. All 39 CPP graduates from two cohorts also completed a cross sectional survey related to their use of CPP. Within the focus group, the openness of the workplace and the intervention's characteristics were considered major factors impacting CPP use; the training program was perceived to promote CPP implementation, and lack of supervision and secondary traumatic stress were the major inhibiting factors. Using CPP-informed therapy, as opposed to CPP with fidelity, was perceived to be one of the main outcomes of the training. Survey results showed that 53% of graduates were using CPP in over three cases, and almost all intended to use CPP within the next year. Ninety-five percent were using CPP principles in their therapeutic work. The implications of importing a new evidence based intervention to a foreign country that utilizes a different dissemination system within a different professional culture are discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)18-24
Number of pages7
JournalEvaluation and Program Planning
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Bottom up dissemination
  • Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)
  • Evidence-based practice (EBP)
  • Implementation

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