Leishmaniasis in the Jordan Valley: differential attraction of dispersing and breeding site populations of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) to manure and water.

Y. Schlein*, B. Yuval, R. L. Jacobson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

The response of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli to traps baited with manure or water was used to compare the behavior of flies near rodent burrows (breeding sites) and dispersing flies in fallow fields. The degree of response in each biotype was defined for each bait by the difference between catches in baited and unbaited traps. Manure bait attracted twice as many flies near the burrows and 2.7 times more flies in the field compared with unbaited traps. In both locations, the manure bait increased the capture of males and nongravid females, whereas gravid females were attracted only near burrows and not in the fields. The catch in the fields with water bait was similar to the unbaited control. However, near burrows, water bait captured more males and gravid females, but not nongravid females. These results demonstrate specific behavioral patterns of the dispersing P. papatasi population.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)411-413
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Medical Entomology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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