Living on the margins of charity coping with poverty in an Ottoman provincial city

Eyal Ginio*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

King Süleyman (Solomon), the gifted prophet king, founded Salonica while touring the world. He arrived there, accompanied by his beloved Bilkis (Queen of Sheba), on a magic throne (taht) that was lifted into the air by jinns and divs (demons). The remains of the king's stunning castle were still visible when the seventeenth-century Ottoman traveler Evliya Çelebi (1611-1682) visited the city. He later recorded this legend in his travelogue.1 Unfortunately, being bereft of any other religious or imperial relics, Salonica had to share the prestige of being established by the highly endowed king with many other localities, as similar legends existed in various cities that boasted pre-Islamic remains.2.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationPoverty and Charity in Middle Eastern Contexts
PublisherState University of New York Press
Pages165-184
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)0791457370, 9780791457375
StatePublished - 2003

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