Molecular fingerprinting of Leishmania infantum strains following an outbreak of visceral leishmaniasis in central Israel

Abedelmajeed Nasereddin, Gad Baneth, Gabriele Schönian, Moein Kanaan, Charles L. Jaffe*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human and canine visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum emerged in central Israel after an absence of over 30 years. The origin of this outbreak was investigated by examining genetic polymorphisms in 37 strains isolated from dogs and patients with visceral leishmaniasis in the continuously active northern Israeli and West Bank foci and in a new Israeli focus using DNA fingerprinting with the human multilocus minisatellite probe 33.15. Analysis of the patterns obtained by DNA fingerprinting separated the strains geographically into northern (clade B) and central (clades A and C) genotypic groups. These results suggest that the emergence of visceral leishmaniasis in central Israel is due not to parasite spread from northern Israel to the new focus but rather to increased parasite transmission in central Israel and the West Bank coupled with changes in the ecoepidemiology of this region.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6054-6059
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

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