Mycoses, bacterial infections and antibacterial activity in sandflies (Psychodidae) and their possible role in the transmission of leishmaniasis

Y. Schlein, I. Polacheck, B. Yuval

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

High incidence of mycoses were found in the guts and malpighian tubes of Phlebotomus papatasi from the Jordan Valley and P. tobbi from Zakinthos, Greece. Infections with several different bacteria were also found in the guts of female P. tobbi. Fungi cultured from guts of laboratory reared P. papatasi that had similar mycoses were identified as Aspergillus sclerotiorum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fungi-infected laboratory reared P. papatasi were refractory to artificial infections with a Leishmania major strain specific to them. The crop contents of P. papatasi, where sugar meals are stored, demonstrated antibacterial activity against the following bacterial species in culture: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus group A and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is postulated that the bacteria-free gut normal to sandflies is effected by the bacterial inhibitor present in the crop.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)57-66
Number of pages10
JournalParasitology
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1985

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge grant support from the project on Epidemiology and Control of Vector Borne Diseases in Israel (REP-NIH-NIAID-A1-12669) and the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Disease. Thanks are also due to Professor Ch. Serie and his team at the Institut Pasteur Hellenique, Athens.

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