Mycosporine-2-glycine is the major mycosporine-like amino acid in a unicellular cyanobacterium (Euhalothece sp.) isolated from a gypsum crust in a hypersaline saltern pond

Laura Kedar, Yoel Kashman, Aharon Oren*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were extracted from a unicellular cyanobacterium (Euhalothece sp.) isolated from a gypsum crust on the bottom of a hypersaline saltern pond in Eilat, Israel. When grown at high light intensities, this isolate contained high concentrations of two MAAs, one showing maximum optical density at 331 nm and one at 362 nm. The compound absorbing at 331 nm was purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography, and its structure was elucidated by one-dimensional (1H and 13C) and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis, and identified as mycosporine-2-glycine. This is the first report of mycosporine-2-glycine in cyanobacteria.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume208
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Mar 2002

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the Israel Salt Co., Eilat, Israel, for allowing access to the saltern ponds, and Inbar Primor and Keren Agay-Shay for help with the 16S rDNA PCR. L.K. thanks Ferran Garcia-Pichel (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA) for his hospitality and helpful discussions at the Max-Planck Institut für Marine Mikrobiologie, Bremen, Germany. This study was supported by a grant from the Israel Science Foundation founded by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Additional support was received from the Moshe Shilo Minerva Center for Marine Biogeochemistry.

Keywords

  • Cyanobacterium
  • Euhalothece
  • Mycosporine-2-glycine
  • Mycosporine-like amino acid

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