New-Media Screen Time Is Not (Necessarily) Linked to Depression: Comments on Twenge, Joiner, Rogers, and Martin (2018)

Yaakov Ophir*, Yuliya Lipshits-Braziler, Hananel Rosenberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this commentary, we raise seven methodological concerns regarding Twenge, Joiner, Rogers, and Martin (2018), among which are inaccurate research measurements, negligible correlations between the main variables, insufficient and inadequate statistical analyses, and problematic interpretation of the results. In fact, the negligible associations between screen activities and depression, their decrease when demographic variables are controlled, and their fading away to nil among boys challenge the article’s title and conclusions, according to which increases in depressive symptoms are attributed to increases in new-media screen use. This conclusion cannot be deduced from the reported results and could be misleading to the general public.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)374-378
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Psychological Science
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019.

Keywords

  • depression
  • moral panic
  • social media
  • social networking sites

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'New-Media Screen Time Is Not (Necessarily) Linked to Depression: Comments on Twenge, Joiner, Rogers, and Martin (2018)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this