New Trends and Patterns in Western European Immigration to the United States: Linking European and American Databases

Elyakim Kislev*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores the latest changes in Western European immigration to the United States by integrating several large databases: the U.S. census, the American Community Surveys, the European Social Survey, as well as the Human Development Index and Gini index. Findings show that the number of individuals born in Western Europe but with family origins elsewhere who have been immigrating to and settling in the United States is increasing. I divide the Western European population that immigrates to the United States into seven different subpopulations by their ancestries and explore the characteristics of these populations before and after immigrating to the United States. I also examine their relative success in terms of economic and labor outcomes in America, finding, for example, that some of the least advantaged immigrant groups have some of the best economic outcomes in the United States. The different self-selection and assimilation patterns among these immigrants have implications for U.S. public policy, which we identify and begin to explore.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)168-189
Number of pages22
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume669
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, © 2017 by The American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Keywords

  • Western Europe
  • immigration
  • integration
  • minorities

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'New Trends and Patterns in Western European Immigration to the United States: Linking European and American Databases'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this