Optogenetic activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons rapidly inhibits spontaneous but not odor-evoked activity in olfactory cortex

Eran Lottem, Magor L. Lörincz*, Zachary F. Mainen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine; 5-HT) is implicated in a variety of brain functions including not only the regulation ofmoodand control of behavior but also the modulation of perception. 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) often fire locked to sensory stimuli, but little is known about how 5-HT affects sensory processing, especially on this timescale. Here, we used an optogenetic approach to study the effect of 5-HT on single-unit activity in the mouse primary olfactory (anterior piriform) cortex. Weshow that activation of DRN 5-HT neurons rapidly inhibits the spontaneous firing of olfactory cortical neurons, acting in a divisive manner, but entirely spares sensory-driven firing. These results identify a new role for serotonergic modulation in dynamically regulating the balance between different sources of neural activity in sensory systems, suggesting a possible role for 5-HT in perceptual inference.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)7-18
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 the authors.

Keywords

  • Feed-forward
  • Feedback
  • Inhibition
  • Neuromodulation
  • Odor

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