Parents’ perceptions of risk for children: A case study of Bedouin parents from unrecognized villages in Israel

Ibtisam Marey-Sarwan, Dorit Roer-Strier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

This qualitative study of 50 indigenous Palestinian Bedouin parents from six unrecognized villages in the Naqab (Negev) Desert in southern Israel explores parental perceptions of risk for children in the context of structural oppression, cultural transition, conservative lifestyle, and ongoing political conflict. Data were collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings demonstrate a wide range of perceived risks, including physical environment–related challenges, parental-related challenges, sociocultural-related challenges, and policy and political-related challenges. Despite these numerous risk factors, Bedouin families report coping and trying to prevent risk through maternal investment in child rearing, social cohesion and tribal support, spirituality and religion, and their collective history. This case study underscores the importance of giving voice to the voiceless, learning from parents about risks for children, understanding how settler colonialism affects Bedouin parents’ everyday lives, and using a context-informed perspective in the debate about risk and child protection.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)171-202
Number of pages32
JournalSocial Service Review
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Parents’ perceptions of risk for children: A case study of Bedouin parents from unrecognized villages in Israel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this