Party systems and oppositional voices in the news media: A study of the contest over political waves in the United States and Israel

Tamir Sheafer*, Gadi Wolfsfeld

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores those factors that raise the level of access for oppositional voices in the news media. The Politicsĝ€" Mediaĝ€"Politics principle argues that cross-national differences in the role of the news media in most political processes can be best understood by examining how variations in political environments affect media performance, which in turn leads to different types of effects on politics. Based on this principle, it is argued that the news media operating in polarized multiparty democracies will allow greater access to oppositional voices than those in two-party democracies. This thesis is examined by comparing the news coverage of major news stories in the United States and Israel in 1984, 1990, and 2000. These two countries provide a useful comparison because they have similar media systems but polar opposite political systems. The results provide strong support for the thesis.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)146-165
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Press/Politics
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Keywords

  • Culture
  • News gathering
  • Political parties
  • Press systems
  • United States

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Party systems and oppositional voices in the news media: A study of the contest over political waves in the United States and Israel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this