Perceived discrimination and well-being among the ultra-Orthodox in Israel: the mediating role of group identity

Yoav S. Bergman*, Gabriel Horenczyk, Rachel Abramovsky-Zitter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined whether perceived discrimination can, in certain minority populations, promote subjective well-being, and whether this connection is mediated by minority group identity. Three hundred thirty-two members of the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Israel, a distinctive religious culture within the Israeli majority culture, participated in the study. Results showed that perceived group discrimination was positively correlated with subjective well-being. Moreover, this connection was mediated by the individual’s identity as Ultra-Orthodox. We address these findings in light of the unique characteristics of the Ultra-Orthodox community, and consider the role of in-group values among certain minority groups as a possible source for the positive connection between discrimination and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1320-1327
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

Keywords

  • Israel
  • group identity
  • mediation
  • perceived discrimination
  • subjective well-being

RAMBI Publications

  • Rambi Publications
  • Group identity -- Israel
  • Ultra-Orthodox Jews -- Israel -- Psychology
  • Discrimination -- Israel

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