Perceptions of abusive and violent husbands by engaged arab men in israel

Muhammad M. Haj-Yahia*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The predictability of engaged Arab men's perceptions of abusive husbands was tested. The analysis was based on variables reflecting three theoretical perspectives: male dominance, intergenerational social learning, and interpersonal skills deficit. The data were derived from a standardized measurement package completed by 434 Arab men in Israel. The results revealed that a combination of predictors from disparate frameworks best explained the variance in the different criterion variables of the study. Lack of skills for establishing positive communication with one's fiancée, traditional and nonegalitarian expectations of marriage, and experience with or witnessing violence in the family of origin best explained the variance in the belief that abusive husbands should not be held responsible for their behavior. The combination of the first two predictors and negative attitudes toward women best explained the variance in the view of the respondents that abusive husbands should not be punished for their violent behavior.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)772-786
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume138
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 1998

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was partially funded by America-Mideast Educational and Training Services, Inc. Additional support was received from the Conflict and Change Center at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute and the College of Human Ecology (which granted the Award for Graduate International Research), both at the University of Minnesota.

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