Perimeter trapping strategy to reduce mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) damage on different host species in Israel

Hadass Cohen*, Boaz Yuval

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

To evaluate the perimeter trapping strategy as a control method, field tests were conducted in three different host species of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), in Israel. Dry traps baited with a three component food-based synthetic attractant that were hung in the peripheral rows of a plum, a pear, and a persimmon orchard, caught female C. capitata (up to 20.1, 1.4, and 4.1 female C. capitata per trap per day, respectively). Fruit damage, estimated at harvest, indicated a negligible percentage for the plum orchard (<1%), 3% for the persimmon orchard (compared with 9% at an untreated neighboring plot), and no damaged fruit in the pear orchard. Finally, dissections of female C. capitata caught in dry traps on different host plant species indicate that a high percentage (range, 84-100%) contained mature eggs. The attraction of mature females to the dry traps might explain the successful results. Future research, to determine precisely how many traps should be placed and how frequently they should be serviced, is necessary before applying this strategy on a commercial basis.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)721-725
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Economic Entomology
Volume93
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Ceratitis capitata
  • Control methods
  • Dry trap
  • Perimeter trapping

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