Politics of Hospitality: African Students at the Hebrew University Medical School in the 1960s

Benny Nuriely, Liat Kozma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

From 1961-1965, the Medical School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem taught four cohorts of medical students from developing countries, mostly African. This article explores the program through the theory of hospitality. First, we find that hospitality is constructed and enabled by international interests. Second, those interests build a status which has unexpected consequences that reveal sorts of hosts, welcoming and xenophobic. Third, as an outcome of the international structure of student exchange, the guests' response to the terms of hospitality was mitigated by their privileged status as international medical students. On the one hand, they appreciated Israel as a model of post-colonial state-building; on the other, they criticized the racist reactions to their presence.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)573-586
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Historical Sociology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Journal of Historical Sociology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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