Population genetics analysis of Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies from Egypt and Jordan based on mitochondrial cytochrome b haplotypes

Catherine M. Flanley, Marcelo Ramalho-Ortigao, Iliano V. Coutinho-Abreu, Rami Mukbel, Hanafi A. Hanafi, Shabaan S. El-Hossary, Emad El Din Y. Fawaz, David F. Hoel, Alexander W. Bray, Gwen Stayback, Douglas A. Shoue, Shaden Kamhawi, Mehmet Karakuş, Kaouther Jaouadi, Mohammad Reza Yaghoobie-Ershadi, Andreas Krüger, Ahmad Amro, Mohamed Amin Kenawy, Mostafa Ramadhan Dokhan, Alon WarburgOmar Hamarsheh, Mary Ann McDowell*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies are major vectors of Leishmania major and phlebovirus infection in North Africa and across the Middle East to the Indian subcontinent. Population genetics is a valuable tool in understanding the level of genetic variability present in vector populations, vector competence, and the development of novel control strategies. This study investigated the genetic differentiation between P. papatasi populations in Egypt and Jordan that inhabit distinct ecotopes and compared this structure to P. papatasi populations from a broader geographical range. Methods: A 461 base pair (bp) fragment from the mtDNA cytochrome b (cyt b) gene was PCR amplified and sequenced from 116 individual female sand flies from Aswan and North Sinai, Egypt, as well as Swaimeh and Malka, Jordan. Haplotypes were identified and used to generate a median-joining network, F ST values and isolation-by-distance were also evaluated. Additional sand fly individuals from Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Libya, Tunisia and Turkey were included as well as previously published haplotypes to provide a geographically broad genetic variation analysis. Results: Thirteen haplotypes displaying nine variant sites were identified from P. papatasi collected in Egypt and Jordan. No private haplotypes were identified from samples in North Sinai, Egypt, two were observed in Aswan, Egypt, four from Swaimeh, Jordan and two in Malka, Jordan. The Jordan populations clustered separately from the Egypt populations and produced more private haplotypes than those from Egypt. Pairwise F ST values fall in the range 0.024-0.648. Conclusion: The clustering patterns and pairwise F ST values indicate a strong differentiation between Egyptian and Jordanian populations, although this population structure is not due to isolation-by-distance. Other factors, such as environmental influences and the genetic variability in the circulating Le. major parasites, could possibly contribute to this heterogeneity. The present study aligns with previous reports in that pockets of genetic differentiation exists between populations of this widely dispersed species but, overall, the species remains relatively homogeneous.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number214
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 27 Mar 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was supported by contract No. W911NF0410380 from the Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded to MAM. OH was supported by a grant from the Eck Institute for Global Health at the University of Notre Dame, a Fulbright Senior Scientist grant, and Zamallah Academic Development Program. CMF was supported by an Arthur J. Schmitt Leadership Fellowship in Science and Engineering and William and Linda Stavropoulos Fellowship in Science. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases or the National Institutes of Health of the US Department of Defense.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Cytochrome b
  • Egypt
  • Genetic differentiation
  • Haplotypes
  • Jordan
  • Phlebotomus papatasi
  • Population genetics
  • Sand flies
  • mtDNA

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