Preventing repeat incidents of family violence: A randomized field test of a second responder program

Robert C. Davis, David Weisburd, Edwin E. Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This field test, conducted with the cooperation of the Redlands, California, Police Department, sought to vary one of the parameters thought to affect the impact of second response programs Victims who called the Redlands police with a domestic abuse complaint were randomly assigned (1) to receive a second response within 24 hours, (2) to receive a second response within seven days, or (3) to receive no second response. An examination of police records and surveys with victims six months after the initial complaint was called did not indicate any reduction in new abuse resulting from any second response condition. The current findings, coupled with earlier research results, strongly suggest that second response programs are at best ineffective in reducing the potential for new abuse and at worst may increase the likelihood of new abusive incidents.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)397-418
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Experimental Criminology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Domestic assault
  • Randomized experiments
  • Recidivism

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