Programmed dna damage and physiological DSBS: Mapping, biological significance and perturbations in disease states

Sara Oster, Rami I. Aqeilan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be the most toxic and threatening of the various types of breaks that may occur to the DNA. However, growing evidence continuously sheds light on the regulatory roles of programmed DSBs. Emerging studies demonstrate the roles of DSBs in processes such as T and B cell development, meiosis, transcription and replication. A significant recent progress in the last few years has contributed to our advanced knowledge regarding the functions of DSBs is the development of many next generation sequencing (NGS) methods, which have considerably advanced our capabilities. Other studies have focused on the implications of programmed DSBs on chromosomal aberrations and tumorigenesis. This review aims to summarize what is known about DNA damage in its physiological context. In addition, we will examine the advancements of the past several years, which have made an impact on the study of genome landscape and its organization.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number1870
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalCells
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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