Promoting intergroup openness and support for equality in a new cultural context: Replicating the effects of internal criticism

Melissa M. McDonald*, Samantha Brindley, Eran Halperin, Tamar Saguy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exposure to an outgroup member voicing criticism of his or her own group fosters greater openness to the outgroup’s perspective. Research suggests that this effect owes its influence to a serial process in which participants’ perception of the risk involved in voicing internal criticism leads to an increase in the perceived credibility of the speaker. The credibility makes it possible for the speaker to be viewed as open-minded, which subsequently inspires greater hope. This process culminates in an increased openness to the outgroup. These findings have been restricted to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but here we examine their generalizability to racial conflict in the United States. Results reveal that White Americans exposed to internal criticism expressed by a Black authority figure express greater openness to African-American perspectives on race relations and are more willing to support policies of racial equality. Replicating past research, this effect is serially mediated by risk, credibility, and hope.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume159
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 May 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Credibility
  • criticism
  • culture
  • hope
  • intergroup relations
  • intervention
  • openness
  • prejudice
  • risk

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