Protection of fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) against oxidative damage by cyanidin-3-rhamnoglucoside Isolated from fig fruits (Ficus carica L.)

Anat Solomon, Sara Golubowicz, Zeev Yablowicz, Margalit Bergman, Shlomo Grossman, Arie Altman, Zohar Kerem*, Moshe A. Flaishman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Anthocyanins, plant secondary metabolites, have been recognized for their health-promoting properties when consumed by humans. In this study, the antioxidant properties of a major anthocyanin in fresh fig fruits, cyanidin-3-rhamnoglucoside (C3R), were evaluated by various assays in vitro and correlated with the protection afforded by C3R to cultured NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells. C3R inhibited lipid peroxidation from producing peroxy radicals (ROO ) and MDA in a dose-dependent manner, and a high calculated stoichiometric coefficient [n] for peroxy radicals was demonstrated. In addition to its scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), C3R showed a strong chelating activity toward the Fe2+ ion. Finally, pretreatment with C3R inhibited proapoptotic processes that were initiated by the oxidation of lysosome membranes in fibroblast cells. The high antioxidant potential, with several modes of action of purified C3R, may contribute to health benefits gained by the consumption of fresh fig fruits.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6660-6665
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume58
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Jun 2010

Keywords

  • Cyanidin-3-rhamnoglucoside (C3R)
  • Fe chelation
  • Fig fruits
  • Linoleic acid oxidation
  • Lysosome membrane stability
  • NIH-3T3 fibroblasts
  • ROS

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