Proving Server Faults: RPCs for Distributed Systems in Byzantine Networks

Jonathan Weiss, Albert Kwon, Yossi Gilad

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Distributed systems are often designed to recover from downed nodes. Unfortunately, it is challenging to create recovery mechanisms that work in Byzantine networks, where the attacker controls some of the nodes and links. Often times an adversarial node can lie about an honest node being offline, and there is no way to verify this claim or detect the liar. To resolve this challenge, we design rRPC, a robust remote procedure call library for distributed systems running in Byzantine networks. rRPC ensures that either the call succeeds or the online caller/callee can create a third-party verifiable proof that the other party is faulty. A distributed system can use these proofs to identify and remove a faulty node automatically. We implement a prototype of rRPC, and use 20 - 100 EC2 VMs to evaluate its performance as a standalone library and in the context of a distributed mix-net system. Our results quantitatively show that rRPC's overhead is low and induces about 1% increase in latency in the common case.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationHotNets 2020 - Proceedings of the 19th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages74-80
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450381451
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Nov 2020
Event19th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, HotNets 2020 - Virtual, Online, United States
Duration: 4 Nov 20206 Nov 2020

Publication series

NameHotNets 2020 - Proceedings of the 19th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks

Conference

Conference19th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, HotNets 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityVirtual, Online
Period4/11/206/11/20

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 ACM.

Keywords

  • byzantine networks
  • distributed systems
  • fault tolerance

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