Psychological Bases of Extreme Policy Preferences: How the Personal Beliefs of Israeli-Jews Predict Their Support for Population Transfer in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Ifat Maoz, Roy J. Eidelson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which Israeli-Jews' beliefs about ingroup vulnerability, injustice, distrust, superiority, and helplessness are linked to extreme policy preferences in the context of the intractable Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In a phone survey of a representative sample (N = 504), stronger beliefs in all domains except for helplessness predicted greater support for the morally problematic transfer of Palestinians from the West Bank and Gaza to neighboring Arab countries compared to alternative policies highlighting territorial compromise. This set of beliefs remained important even after taking into consideration the respondents' political orientation and degree of religiosity.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1476-1497
Number of pages22
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume50
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Keywords

  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • compromise solutions
  • core beliefs
  • extreme policy preferences
  • intractable conflict
  • public opinion

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