Receptivity to violence in ethnically divided societies: A micro-level mechanism of perceived horizontal inequalities

Dan Miodownik*, Lilach Nir

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although past scholarship shows that group inequalities in economic and political power (“Horizontal Inequalities”) correlate with dissent, violence, and civil wars, there is no direct empirical test of the perceptual explanation for this relationship at the individual level. Such explanation is vital to understanding how integration, inclusion in power-sharing agreements, and exclusion from political power filter down to mass publics. Moreover, subjective perceptions of group conditions do not always correspond to objective group realities. We hypothesize subjective perceptions attenuate the effect of objective exclusion on support for violence in ethnically divided societies. Cross-national comparative multilevel analyses of the 2005/6 Afrobarometer dataset (N = 19,278) confirm that subjective perceptions both amplify the effect of exclusion on acceptance of violence and alter the readiness of included groups to dissent. These findings carry implications for research, state-building, and conflict management.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)22-45
Number of pages24
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Receptivity to violence in ethnically divided societies: A micro-level mechanism of perceived horizontal inequalities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this