Recollections of harsh discipline in childhood and depressive feelings in adulthood: The roles of culture and gender

Maayan Davidov, Mona Khoury-Kassabri*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the roles of culture and gender in the association between recollections of harsh discipline experienced during childhood and levels of depressive feelings in early adulthood. A sample of Jewish (n= 250) and Arab (n= 115) university students reported regarding exposure to corporal punishment and emotional aggression from each parent during childhood, and about current depressive feelings. Consistent with predictions, both culture and gender moderated the links between corporal punishment (used by either mother or father) and depression. Arab males, for whom exposure to corporal punishment might be more culturally normative, showed a different pattern than both Arab females and Jewish respondents. Moreover, culture moderated the association between emotional aggression from fathers (but not mothers) and depression. The discussion focuses on the importance of examining the effects of gender (of child and parent) in conjunction with culture, and on the complex role of cultural normativeness.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1007-1014
Number of pages8
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The study was supported by a research grant from the Warburg Foundation .

Keywords

  • Corporal punishment
  • Culture
  • Depression
  • Emotional aggression
  • Gender

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