Reduction of Pear Psylla Damage by the Predatory Bug Anthocoris nemoralis (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae): The Importance of Orchard Colonization Time and Neighboring Vegetation

Liora Shaltiel, Moshe Coll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

: This 5-year field study was aimed at assessing the importance of predatory arthropods in suppressing pear psylla, Cacopsylla bidens (Sulc), and reducing damage caused by psylla in pear orchards in northern Israel. Correlative data suggest that Anthocoris nemoralis (Fabricius) is the only naturally occurring predator in the system that may reduce pear psylla damage; densities of other predacious taxa in the system (Araneidae, Orius spp., Chrysopidae and Coccinellidae) were not correlated significantly with psylla numbers in the orchards. However, A. nemoralis entered pear orchards at least a month after the beginning of pear psylla activity, apparently too late to prevent fruit damage. Data suggest that A. nemoralis reproduction is lower on both wild and cultivated pears than on Rhamnus, Laurus and Pistacia trees in nearby woods. Furthermore, A. nemoralis populations build up on the wild trees in March, but appear in orchards only in late May. We propose that planting R. alaternus trees near pear orchards could enhance the level of biological control of pear psylla by A. nemoralis. Preliminary results indeed show that pear psylla densities were lower on pear trees grown near Rhamnus alaternus trees than on distant trees.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)811-821
Number of pages11
JournalBiocontrol Science and Technology
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2004, Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Anthocoris Nemoralis
  • Cacopsylla Bidens
  • Conservation Biological Control
  • Fruit Damage
  • Pear Psylla
  • Population Dynamics
  • Predation

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